Ginger Fights Body Fat

Ginger, as a supplement or an ingredient in food and drink, may protect against obesity and chronic disease, according to a new research review. While experts can’t yet recommend a specific dosage for preventive purposes, they say that consuming more of the pungent spice is smart for several reasons. The new review, published in theRead More

Life is not a Burden

Some of us allow grief and pain to strangle life from us. We become severely depressed. We become overly anxious and nervous. We withdraw from life (although we appear to be present). We try suppressing our thoughts and feelings with illegal and even legal substances. We eat obsessively. We become so angry that we lashRead More

Protein supplements for teens, are they safe?

Football, baseball, field hockey, swimming, basketball, and cross country are just a few of the competitive sports high school students play. And, just like adult athletes, they’re looking for an edge. With ads for protein powder everywhere and drool-worthy protein shake recipes on every health blog, it’s unsurprising that some teens are trying protein supplementsRead More

What is the anti-inflammatory diet?

You’ve been prescribed an anti-inflammatory diet. What does that even mean? In my daily interactions with patients, there are certain buzzwords that always seem to weave into conversation: gluten-free, coconut, protein, genetically modified organisms (GMOs), and the big one — and often most obscure — anti-inflammatory. Many people come to me because they read aboutRead More

Simply Cardio

Aerobic/cardiovascular exercise, or cardio for short, targets your heart. In addition to improving your heart health, it also provides benefits to many other areas in your body as you’ll need to work multiple muscle groups in order to perform aerobic exercise. While the good news is that cardio can be great for your entire body,Read More

Think Twice About a Gluten-Free Diet

One piece of good news: A new study in the British Medical Journal reveals that for most people, eating gluten—a protein found in wheat, rye, and barley—is not, as some believe, linked to a higher risk of heart disease. In fact, unless you have celiac disease, going gluten-free might actually harm your heart, reports Andrew Chan, M.D., associateRead More