Taking too much vitamin D

Nearly one in five U.S. adults are taking supplemental vitamin D, and a growing number are taking excessively high doses linked to an increased risk of fractures, falls, kidney stones and certain cancers, a new study suggests. Vitamin D helps the body use calcium to support bone health. The recommended daily intake of vitamin DRead More

Running miles to lose weight?

In the United States, a nation fatter than any other, running remains the most popular workout activity. That’s according to a Fitbit analysis of fitness tracker user data. And if tied-up treadmills across the country are any indication, much of that running is long distance. Here’s the cruel catch, though: Running miles at a timeRead More

Even moderate drinking may speed brain decline

Imbibing just a handful of beers a week is associated with long-term changes to a person’s brain, a new study finds — although the functional meaning of these changes is unclear. Why it matters: While it’s widely accepted that drinking too much is bad for you, conventional wisdom — and the government’s dietary guidelines — saysRead More

Washing Hands In Cold Water Works As Well As Hot

Good news for anyone planning on getting their hands dirty this summer: Washing them with cold or lukewarm water will work just as well as hot water to remove bacteria, according to a new study published in the Journal of Food Protection. In handwashing experiments with 21 volunteers, Rutgers University researchers found no significant differenceRead More

Evidence Against Diet Sodas

Many people think of diet sodas as healthy, low-calorie alternatives to sugary drinks. Yet a small but growing body of evidence suggests that diet sodas may have health downsides and may not even provide the benefits some people turn to them for, such as weight loss. “Excess sugar intake is a problem in Western societyRead More